When Something Goes Wrong - A Lesson in Advertising

There are millions of variables when sending out a newsletter or offering a promotion only. First, you have user aptitude. Second, which browser a person uses can greatly impact results (Internet Explorer, I'm looking at you). Third, have they updated their apps or computer? I could likely list off factors all day long, but I'm not here to give you a list. Let's talk about what happens when a problem occurs.

Are you equipped to deal with an issue?

Just last night there was an issue that came up for a client. An unforeseen bug appeared in a live environment that didn't exist in testing. We were able to diagnose the issue within 12 hours and offer a fix. This is because our experienced technical team were able to take disjointed notes from those complaining and create a patch. What do I mean by disjointed?

Here are some samples:

"It's not working. This is stupid."

"I can't get [product]. I click like crazy and it just doesn't do anything."

My favourite though, "My grandson is a computer genius and even he can't figure this out."

Of the 10,806 people to receive the promotion, 15 people had issues and it was due to a small bug with tabbed browsing on out of date platforms such as IE, Chrome, and Safari.

With that said, we've encountered many of these types of issues over the years, and I'd like to offer you a few steps to dealing with the issue:

1. Once the problem presents, if the issue is on a page you control, put up a notice.

2. Be honest and let your customers know you are working on a fix to an unforeseen issue. People respond positively to honesty for the most part.

3. Breathe. You're getting hit from all sides but losing your head will not help anyone, especially you.

4. Consult with your tech team, and look for a fix or at least a work around.

5. Offer the solution on the original form of communication. So, if the issue was on Facebook, offer the solution on Facebook. If the issue came from a newsletter, send a followup.

It is critical to your success that you don't let the issue get you down. In this world of computing there are often going to be issues you never saw coming. No one expects perfection; but they do expect you to be honest and help.

I hope this helps, but if you don't have a tech team to assist you in moments of crisis, please let's talk.